Menu Contact

Divorce Archives

Divorce rates by occupation

North Carolina residents who work in fields that involve travel or night life might have marriages that are more vulnerable to divorce than people whose jobs offer more stable hours and a higher income. Data from 2015 gathered in the American Community Survey and presented by FlowingData found that occupations associated with math or science had the lowest divorce rates.

Joint bank accounts and divorce

North Carolina couples who are getting a divorce may need to close any jointly owned assets such as bank and credit card accounts. With credit card accounts, it is important to make sure that any debts are paid off. Creditors might pursue either person for a joint credit card debt regardless of who was actually responsible for the debt in the first place.

Keeping the family home in a divorce

When a North Carolina resident is considering a divorce, one major goal he or she may have is keeping the family home. In many cases, the family home is the couple's biggest asset. For those who have kids, retaining ownership of the family home may be important to ensuring a stable home life once the divorce is finalized.

What to know about going through a divorce

North Carolina estranged couples can use the formal divorce process to set the terms for the end of their marriages. In most cases, it will be used to determine who gets to keep property that was accumulated during the marriage. While the property division process is not always equal, courts like to make it as equitable as possible. Separate property is usually retained by the party who brought it into the marriage.

How a legal separation differs from divorce

Some North Carolina couples who are splitting up might decide they want a legal separation instead of a divorce. A couple might also want a legal separation while they decide whether or not they want to go through with a divorce. A legal separation has many of the same elements as a divorce including child custody and visitation. Child and spousal support may also be involved, but when there is a legal separation instead of a divorce, they are sometimes referred to as separation maintenance.

Amicable divorce myths, pitfalls for the unwary

While an attractive proposition for a divorcing couple in Charlotte, an amicable end of a marriage is not always to the benefit of both parties. Whether through a no-fault divorce or an uncontested finding of fault, one or both spouses could end up with a lopsided property division. The couple may end up returning to court as well to revisit orders.

How parents can prepare children for divorce

North Carolina parents who are ending their marriage should communicate with their children about an impending divorce. Children will know that something is wrong, and talking to them about it gives them the opportunity to ask questions and express their fears. This is also a good time for parents to reassure their children that they are not responsible for the situation and that their parents will still be there for them. Parents should try to present a unified front for their children, and if children do not talk about the divorce, parents should ask them how they are feeling about it.

Unemployment increases risk of being divorced

Many factors cause couples in North Carolina to split, and financial problems contribute to marital strain. A study conducted by a Harvard University sociology professor and published in 2016 identified the unemployment of a husband as an issue that could cause the wife to file for divorce. Statistically, over the course of any year, a man without a full-time job has a 3.3 percent chance of getting divorced. Men with full-time work get divorced at a rate of 2.5 percent.

Divorcing over politics

While many North Carolina couples decide to get a divorce due to incompatibility or finances, data shows that some are doing so over disagreements regarding politics. According to the study, approximately 10 percent of divorcing couples listed their reason for divorce as political disagreements.

Pre- and postnuptial agreements as protection from debt

North Carolina residents who are concerned about their current or future spouse's debt might want to consider creating a pre- or postnuptial agreement to protect them from those obligation. A pre- or postnup can specify that the debt a spouse incurs after the marriage belongs solely to that spouse. It can even include provisions that allow the other spouse to periodically takes steps such as examining the debtor spouse's credit report. This may be helpful if one spouse has an issue such as a gambling addiction.

Tell Us About Your Situation

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Our Team

Meet Our Team

Office Location

14835 Ballantyne Village Way, Suite 225
Charlotte, NC 28277

Toll Free: 866-935-0291
Phone: 704-512-0619
Charlotte Office Location