Menu Contact

Child Custody Archives

Navigating the holidays after a separation or divorce

When in the midst of a divorce or separation, the manner in which couples navigate the holidays may have a long-lasting effect on both the resolution of future issues and the wellness of the children. North Carolina couples who have recently begun their legal processes may want to remain aware that a first holiday season celebrated in separate households is likely a prelude to the many special times ahead during which a parent might be required to share the children with an ex-spouse.

Cooperation in post divorce parenting is the key

Divorced North Carolina couples with young children often have a difficult time in parenting their offspring in two separate households. The differences between the parents that led to their divorce, such as communication, are still present. Adding to those problems, the children themselves are now in an unfamiliar and emotionally difficult situation. During this time, parenting skills must come to the forefront.

Co-parents can work together for their children

Parenting after a divorce or separation can be a difficult situation for North Carolina estranged couples. Even in the most amicable of splits, a co-parenting relationship can be a delicate balance that is affected by the past history of the marriage as well as the best interests of the children.

Child custody in North Carolina

Statistics show that eight out of 10 judges award sole custody to mothers when custody disputes are brought to court. This might seem like a win for mothers; however, issues could emerge. Some women eventually find that while they won the custody battle, it came at the price of career advancement and financial independence.

American fathers and parenting

Fathers in North Carolina and the rest of the nation have been taking a more significant role in the care of their children and in completing chores in the home. While the number of single and stay-at-home fathers has been increasing over the last few decades, a rising number of children are becoming adults without having lived with a father.

Shared physical custody is gaining popularity

There has been an emerging trend toward shared child custody arrangements for divorced parents. Historically, North Carolina family courts would most often award primary physical custody to the mother, with the father being given visitation rights on weekends or pursuant to another schedule. This is slowly changing.

Nesting concept can ease divorce transition for children

North Carolina parents who are going through a divorce could consider the concept of nesting for reducing the disturbance to the lives of their children, at least in the near term. A nesting arrangement allows children to continue to live in the family home, and the separated parents take turns living there and providing child care.

When can virtual contact with a parent be blocked?

North Carolina parents who are embroiled in child custody disputes sometimes wonder if they are allowed to block their children's other parents from communicating with them via email, text message or social media. Technological advances have helped noncustodial parents have many new ways to keep connected with their children. Some courts have started issuing virtual visitation orders which allow noncustodial parents to have virtual contact with their children when they are with the custodial parents.

Preparing for a child custody hearing

North Carolina parents who are going through a divorce may also need to make a decision about child custody and visitation. If parents cannot agree, then the decision will have to be made by a judge. A judge decides who will be the better parent and what is in the child's best interests even if one parent does not agree with that criteria.

Putting kids first when parents divorce

Although divorce is fairly common today, when a North Carolina child's parents split up, it can still be a very difficult experience. Studies have shown that divorces can have lasting emotional effects on children, but there are ways that parents can help make the process easier for kids. Some of these include opting for a method that is less contentious and being sure to keep disagreements away from children.

Tell Us About Your Situation

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Our Team

Meet Our Team

Office Location

14835 Ballantyne Village Way, Suite 225
Charlotte, NC 28277

Toll Free: 866-935-0291
Phone: 704-512-0619
Charlotte Office Location

Review Us